National Union Fire insurance Company of Pittsburgh PA

The Fifth Circuit recently upheld the dismissal on summary judgment of a policyholder’s claim under a commercial crime insurance policy, affirming the trial court’s narrow interpretation of the terms “owned” and “loss,” concluding that the policyholder did not “own” the funds at issue or suffer a “loss” when it loaned those funds to the fraudsters. In so holding, the court ignored state court precedent concerning construction of those same terms.

In Cooper Industries, Ltd. v. National Union Fire Insurance Co. of Pittsburgh, Pa., No. 16-20539 (5th Cir. Nov. 20, 2017), Cooper invested its pension-plan assets into what proved to be a multimillion-dollar Ponzi scheme. Over the course of many years, Cooper invested more than $175 million into various equity and bond investments managed by fraudsters who used the investment funds in furtherance of the Ponzi scheme. After discovering the fraud, Cooper recouped a large portion of its investment and sought coverage from its commercial crime insurer for the unrecovered $35 million. The policy limited coverage to “loss” of property that Cooper “owned.” Neither term was defined in the policy. Continue Reading Fifth Circuit Finds No Coverage Under Commercial Crime Policy Based on Narrow Construction of Undefined Terms

Maryland’s highest court recently held that a policyholder’s failure to provide notice of a lawsuit for two and a half years was no basis for a denial of coverage. The court in Nat’t Union Fire Ins. Co. of Pittsburgh, PA v. Fund for Animals, Inc. held instead that, because National Union could not prove it suffered “actual prejudice” as a result of the late notice, Fund For Animals, Inc. (“FFA”) was entitled to receive the coverage it contracted for under its non-for-profit liability insurance policy (the “Policy”).

Continue Reading Maryland High Court Holds Late Notice Is No Bar To Coverage